Is it bad to take supplements every day?

In reality, there can be too many good things, and anything in excess, be it vitamins, supplements or foods, can cause serious problems. In terms of vitamins, some are fat-soluble, which means they are stored in the liver and you don't need them every day, while others are water-soluble and need to be replenished.

Is it bad to take supplements every day?

In reality, there can be too many good things, and anything in excess, be it vitamins, supplements or foods, can cause serious problems. In terms of vitamins, some are fat-soluble, which means they are stored in the liver and you don't need them every day, while others are water-soluble and need to be replenished. Many people choose to take supplements, but taking them too much or taking them for too long can be harmful. The Department of Health and Social Care recommends certain supplements for some groups of people who are at risk for deficiency.

These are the essential vitamins that you are not getting enough of. If you're feeling exhausted day after day, a multivitamin may be the motivation you've been craving to get going. Life Extension educational scientist Dr. Vanessa Pavey, ND, explains that taking a multivitamin provides essential water-soluble B vitamins that we need to release the energy that is trapped inside carbohydrates, fats, and proteins.

These are the 11 best food sources of B vitamins for more energy. Speaking of vitamins, this is what taking vitamin C every day does to your body. You should also give any new supplements your doctor or pharmacist is considering before adding them to your regimen. But will all those supplements be of any use to you? And most importantly, is it possible to take too many vitamins? We asked those questions to health and nutrition experts and delved into the latest research.

Half of all American adults, including 70 percent of those 65 and older, take a multivitamin or other vitamin or mineral supplement regularly. For them, reports the National Academy of Medicine, vitamin D supplements prescribed by a doctor are beneficial. Leavey said iron deficiency, which can cause fatigue and dizziness, is common among menstruating women, but that an iron supplement (in addition to an iron-rich diet) can help combat that deficiency. Even if none of your supplements individually exceed the upper limit of a given nutrient, combining several pills such as a multivitamin and an additional vitamin D capsule, for example, can add up to higher doses than recommended.

Most people don't need to take vitamin supplements and can get all the vitamins and minerals they need by eating a healthy, balanced diet. Millstine, noting that research shows that calcium is better absorbed through food than through supplements. Food %26 Drug Administration (FDA) is not authorized to review dietary supplements for safety and effectiveness before they are marketed. Supplemental vitamin D is popular because it is difficult (if not impossible) to get enough from food.

However, if you adjust your diet and still want to try supplements, Leavey suggested consulting your primary care physician to help guide you through the process. A surprising study published in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine, which examined the data of nearly 40,000 women over 19 years, found that, on average, women who took supplements had a higher risk of dying compared to women who did not take supplements. While you should definitely strive for a variety of nutrients every day, including vitamins and minerals, Leavey does not recommend “routine intake of vitamin supplements to achieve this goal.

Sylvia Sako
Sylvia Sako

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