Why aren't supplements as good as food?

Supplements are not meant to replace food. They cannot replicate all the nutrients and benefits of whole foods, such as fruits and vegetables.

Why aren't supplements as good as food?

Supplements are not meant to replace food. They cannot replicate all the nutrients and benefits of whole foods, such as fruits and vegetables. On the one hand, says Chakravarty, supplements are specific extracts of nutritional components for a healthy diet. When you eat natural foods, there is much more nutritional power in foods that the supplement does not contain.

Nutrients consumed through supplements do not improve health and longevity as effectively as those consumed through food, according to the study. While getting the right nutrients in the right amounts from food was associated with longer life, the same was not the case with nutrients in supplements, says study co-author Fang Zhang, associate professor of epidemiology at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University. You're not actually making up for nutrients lost when taking supplements for two main reasons. First, certain nutrients that are essential for good health can only be found in real foods.

Second, supplements are not regulated by the U.S. UU. UU. (FDA) as drugs are, so there is no guarantee that what it says on the bottle is what you actually ingest.

People who took high doses of calcium through supplements had a 53% higher risk of dying from cancer than people who did not take supplements, according to the study. The use of supplements varies widely in Europe (30), both in prevalence and in the type of supplement consumed. In an era of once-a-day multivitamins and supplement aisles, it's never been more convenient to tailor your personal nutritional needs at your local supermarket. The supplement industry has taken advantage of that active lifestyle, but if you are already practicing a generally healthy and diverse diet, you are unlikely to need additional vitamins.

Taking into account the variation in supplement use across Europe (30.3), supplements vary in the contribution they make to dietary intake and the proportion of populations at risk of not complying with the DRVs of sufficiency. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) does not maintain supplements to the same standards as conventional foods or drugs, so manufacturers are responsible for handling safety testing and labeling themselves; FDA only intervenes when there is a problem with a product that is already being sold. The choice of the tool for evaluating dietary supplements will have an impact on how these problems can be addressed. Although such intakes would need to be maintained over a long period of time to affect health, and compiling a single 4-day diary might not be sufficient to reflect a person's usual intake or capture the varying behavior of supplementation use.

A meta-analysis of MVMM-type supplement trials concluded that there was no benefit with respect to total, cardiovascular or cancer mortality (90). It also points to some limitations in the study, including the duration of the use of dietary supplements studied and the fact that the use of dietary supplements was subject to recall biases. But with a great deal of uncertainty and lack of evidence for supplements, Zhang says the average person should only eat a balanced diet that contains plenty of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains, rather than turning to over-the-counter solutions. Meta-analyses of trials studying MVMM supplements so far have indicated that if populations are optimally nourished, supplementation does not play a role: “Enough is enough (10.A secondary objective is to focus on the role of supplements in nutrient distribution, circulating biomarkers, and disease, using a variety of examples illustrating its (in) efficacy in public health.

Disease analysis of supplements can be fraught with confusion when simply comparing SU to NSU; nutrient intake from supplements may require researchers to maintain detailed data on the composition of the supplement that is time-consuming; while biomarkers will leave the researcher with a sample concentration, but without a clue what was actually consumed. Before taking any supplement for disease prevention, it is important to know if the potential benefits outweigh the risks. . .

Sylvia Sako
Sylvia Sako

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